Avijjapaccaya: Ignorance as a Requisite Condition. The word is explained in Paticcasamuppada Sutta (Discourse of Dependent Origination) as “avijja paccaya sankhara” meaning “With Ignorance as a requisite condition, arise Mental Formations.”

Arahant: An enlightened being who is free from defilements and no longer subjected to rebirths or attained Nibbana.

Arahant: one who has purified himself of all defilements, and who, on the death of the physical body, will attain Nibbana. He has escaped samsara and will not be reborn.

Arahant: A person who has rid his mind of all impurities (i.e. rid his mind of desire, anger and ignorance), and has attained to the Supreme State. Also referred to as a Worthy One or a Perfect One.

Ariya-puggala: Those who have permanently attained to one of the states on the verge of Enlightenment, namely:

[a] Sotāpatti-Magga (the One who has Entered into the Path of Stream-Enterer) and Sotāpatti-Phala (the One who has Accomplished the Fruit of Stream-

Entry);

[b] Sakadāgāmi-Magga (the One who has Entered into the Path of Once-Returner) and Sakadāgāmi-Phala (the One who has Accomplished the Fruit of

the Once-Returner);

[c] Anāgāmi-Magga (the One who has Entered into the Path of the Non-Returner) and Anāgāmi-Phala (the One who has Accomplished the Fruit of the

Non-Returner), and

[d] Arahatta-Magga (the One who has Entered into the Path of the Arahant) and Arahatta-Phala (the One who has Accomplished the Fruit of the Arahant).

Attaining Dhamma: meditative attainment; a state of absorption in meditation where the mind achieves super insight and knowledge; knowing and seeing according to the truths.

Attaining Dhamma: a state of absorption in meditation where the mind achieves super insight and knowledge, knowing and seeing according to the truths.

Attainment of Dhammakaya: a state of absorption in meditation where the mind achieves super insight and knowledge, having penetrative insight into the reality of life and the world; seeing and becoming one with one’s own inner Body of Enlightenment.

Attaining the Dhammakaya: a state of absorption in meditation where the mind achieves super insight and knowledge, having penetrative insight into the reality of life and the world; seeing and becoming one with one’s own inner Body of Enlightenment.

Āloka-kasina: A technique of meditation which uses a brilliant point of light as the object of concentration.

Bhikkhu: Buddhist monk.

Blessings (mangala): prosperity; auspiciousness; good omen; anything that is conducive to success.

Bodhisatta: One who determines to be a Buddha in the future.

Bodhisatta: a Buddha-to-be; one destined to become a Buddha.

Bodhisatva: (In Pali: Bodhisatta) One who is destined for Buddhahood as a result of making the Bodhisatva Vow; not only does s/he vow to bring themself to

Nibbāna, but to return unfailingly back to the world until s/he has helped many other sentient beings to reach Enlightenment.

Brahmin: Normally refers to a social class of people belonging to Hindu faith, who reserve the right to worship Hindu gods and to study their Scriptures.

However, the term is used in Buddhism to refer to anyone with the goal of selfpurification, who trains strictly in a religious tradition.

Buddha: an ‘awaken one’ who is fully enlightened and who has realized Nibbana without the benefit of a Buddha’s teaching in the lifetime in which he attains it. Those who attained enlightenment by following the Buddha’s teachings are called Arahants or Arahats. The name Buddha is a generic term, not a proper name, meaning ‘awakened’, thus ‘enlightened’. Buddhas appear at vast intervals of time. There are countless numbers of past, present and future Buddhas.

Buddhajak Center: former name of the Dhammakaya Temple.

Buddha: ‘Awakened One’, one who is fully enlightened and who has realized Nibbana without the benefit of a Buddha’s teaching in the lifetime in which he attains it. Those who attained enlightenment by following the Buddha’s teachings are called Arahants or Arahats. The name Buddha is a title, not a proper name, meaning ‘awakened’, thus ‘enlightened’. Buddhas appear at vast intervals of time. There are countless numbers of past, present and future Buddhas.

Cetiya: Pali word for pagoda.

Chand: Khun Yai’s first name; a Thai word which means “the moon”.

Defilements (Pali, kilesa): mental impurities consisting of greed, anger, and delusion; hindrances or contaminants that cause beings to perform undesirable deeds.

Dhammakaya: Body of Enlightenment; Body of Truth. Dhammakaya meditation is a profound meditation technique taught by Luang Por Wat Paknam. Khun Yai carried on the Dhammakaya meditation tradition and passed it on to her student, Luang Por Dhammajayo, current Abbot of the Dhammakaya Temple.

Dhammakaya Tradition (vijja Dhammakaya): In the Dhammakaya Tradition (also referred to as Dhammakaya Knowledge), it has been established that each individual person possesses 18 bodies. The 18 bodies comprise of the physical body, refined physical body, celestial body, refined celestial body, Rupa Brahma body, refined Rupa Brahma body, Arupa Brahma body, refined Arupa Brahma body, Gotrubhu Dhammakaya, refined Gotrabhu Dhammakaya, Sotapanna Dhammakaya, refined Sotapanna Dhammakaya, Sakadagami Dhammakaya, refined Sakadagami Dhammakaya, Anagami Dhammakaya, refined Anagami Dhammakaya, Arahat Dhammakaya, and refined Arahat Dhammakaya. The Arahat Dhammakaya body is the purest body of enlightenment and is attained when one achieves the highest level of Dhammakaya meditation.

Dhamma: A phenomenon when seen as an aspect of the universe, rather than identified with as personal. When capitalised, it refers to the teaching of the Buddha as contained in the scriptures or the Ultimate Truth towards which the teaching points. (In Sanskrit, it is known as ‘dharma’)

The Brahmas: A class of supra-celestial beings who abide purely by the pleasure derived from meditation rather than the sensual pleasure enjoyed by beings of lower realms.

The Five Aggregates:  The Five Aggregates or the psycho-physical constituents of our body and mind. In Pali pañca-khandha; or more commonly in Sanskrit;pañca-skandha.

Wat: (derived from the Sanskrit word Vattaka) represents a monastery temple in Cambodia, Thailand, or Laos.